CALL TO ATTEND:

GOLF

GRANT BENNETT

1980

The legendary youth golf teacher coached Florence’s McClenaghan High to six state championships and seven Southern titles from 1951-64. He conceived and built the Country Club of South Carolina in Florence. He is a SCAHOF past president (1993) and also is a member of the South Carolina Golf, Carolinas Golf, and Carolinas PGA Halls of Fame.

P.J. BOATWRIGHT, JR.

1976

Hailing from Spartanburg, this two-time Carolina Open champion (1957-59) and Wofford College star qualified for four U.S. Amateurs.  Later a respected national golf administrator as Executive Director of the USGA (1969-91), Boatwright became known as the world’s foremost authority on the Rules of Golf.   He is a member of the South Carolina Golf and Carolinas Halls of Fame.

JANE COVINGTON

1973

The Orangeburg native, five-time CGA champion and five-time South Carolina champion dominated women’s amateur golf in the Carolinas from the late 1940s to the mid-1960s.

CAROLYN CUDONE

1975

The women’s golf star won 48 major titles (1950-74) including five USGA National Senior crowns, five Carolinas Golf Association Medal Play championships, and four South Carolina Golf Association Medal Play titles.  She captained the U.S. Curtis Cup team.

BETH DANIEL

1978

Twice won the U.S. Women’s Amateur (1975 and 1977) and led Furman University to the NCAA Championship to become the SCAHOF’s youngest inductee at age 20, the native of Charleston became a three-time LPGA Player of the Year and three-time leading money winner (1980, 1981, 1990).  She won the 1976 LPGA Championship and finished second in five other majors, and had a record 25 top-10 finishes in majors. She is a member of the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame.

FRANK FORD

1995

A standout golfer from Charleston who won seven South Carolina Amateur titles from 1930-50, Ford also finished as runner-up three times, and won the 1937 International 4-Ball title.

RANDY GLOVER

1982

The Cheraw native won eight South Carolina Opens, seven Carolina PGA Player of the Year awards, and played on three PGA Cup Match Play teams.

JAY HAAS

2005

The Greer native starred at Wake Forest University and won nine PGA tournaments and three Ryder Cups.  He finished third in the 1995 Masters and second in the 2003 PGA before becoming a force on the Senior Tour.

PAUL HAHN

1976

This trick-shot golf artist from Charleston has entertained fans around the world.  Known as golf’s ambassador-at-large, Hahn entertained fans at Augusta National and St. Andrews as well as American troops abroad.

KATHRYN HEMPHILL

1974

This native Columbian was a three-time SCGA champion, won the Texas Open in 1939, the Mexican National Championship in 1936-37, and played on the Curtis Cup Team in 1938.  

KATHY HITE

1991

The Florence sub-junior golf champion in 1961-62, the Winthrop College graduate won the South Carolina Interscholastic title and South Carolina Women’s crown in 1969, and finished seventh in the U.S. Amateur before playing on the LPGA Tour from 1974-87.

BETSY KING

1992

King, from Reading, Pa., led Furman University to the NCAA Women’s National Championship in 1976.  A three-time LPGA Player of the Year (1984, 1989, 1993), King led the tour in earnings three times and won six majors – including the U.S. Open in 1989 and 1990, and the British Open in 1992.  Her 34 wins on the LPGA Tour were instrumental in her being enshrined in the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1995.

BOBBY KNOWLES

1985

The Massachusetts native and longtime Aiken resident twice won golf’s South Carolina Amateur, South Carolina Senior Amateur, and Carolina Senior tournaments.  The 1950 U.S. Amateur semifinalist won the French Amateur in 1951 and played on the 1951 Walker Cup Team.

HAPP LATHROP

2014

Regarded by many as “Mr. Golf” in South Carolina, Lathrop presided over the game as executive director of the South Carolina Golf Association for more than four decades.  In 1976, he became the first full-time employee of the Association when membership involved 99 clubs (about 11,500 golfers) and assets stood at $50,000. When he stepped down in 2017, the association commanded more than $1 million in assets and represented the interests of more than 57,500 golfers across 285 clubs.  A fine player in his own right, the Hampton native won the state amateur championship in 1968 as an 18-year old, becoming the youngest to do so at that time. As an administrator, Lathrop helped create one of the most successful and respected junior development programs in the country through the South Carolina Junior Golf Association (1989) and the South Carolina Junior Golf Foundation (1995).  In addition to producing numerous PGA Tour players, those organizations have fostered strong and healthy competition for juniors. Since its inception in 1995, the SCJGA has provided more than $2.5 million toward youth-oriented programs centered around golf.

JACK LEWIS

1987

Florence native led McClenaghan High to five Southern Intercollegiate and four state championships and won the Carolinas Golf Association crown three times.  He became a two-time All-American at Wake Forest University (1968 and 1979), won the ACC golf title in 1968, and played three years on the PGA Tour (1970-73).

DOTTIE PEPPER

2008

A three-time golf All-American at Furman University before winning 17 LPGA tournaments, including two majors, Pepper, from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., led the LPGA in victories in 1992 and 1996, and played on five Solheim Cup teams.  She was the LPGA Player of the Year in 1992 and captured an ESPY as best female golfer in 1993.

HENRY PICARD

1977

A club golf professional in Charleston (1925-34), Picard won 26 PGA Tour events including the 1938 Masters.  In 1939, the Plymouth, Mass., native captured the 1939 PGA Championship, and led the PGA in earnings. “Pick” was a fixture in the local golf community in his later years, and helped future LPGA and South Carolina Athletic Hall of Famer Beth Daniel when she was in her teens.

ALLEN POWERS

2000

The All-American golfer from USC (1966-68) was known for his prodigious tee shots.  Powers set six club records and won six Carolinas Golf Association championships.

BETSY RAWLS

1962

The Spartanburg native won 55 LPGA tournaments, including eight majors and four Women’s National Opens from 1961-75.  She is one of the LPGA’s founders, its first president (1961-67), and a charter inductee in the LPGA Tour Hall of Fame in 1967.  She was the second female inductee of the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame, following Lucille Godbold in 1961.

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